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  • 09/06/13--15:52: KADI Osama
  • Informations essentielles / Basic information

    – 1968 – Khaleej Times (March 17, 2013): Osama Kadi was born in Aleppo in 1968
    – 1985-1989 – Amazon.com (July 15, 2007): Bachelor Degree in Economics and Planning at the Aleppo University (Syria)
    – 1990-1992 – Amazon.com (July 15, 2007): Pre-Master Diploma in Economics and Planning at the Aleppo University (Syria)
    – April 2-6, 1994 – Osama Kadi (tripod.com – 2002): Osama Kadi takes part to an International Conference on Iraqi Aggression of Kuwait
    – 1996 – Osama Kadi (Syrian Economic Task Force / Profile – August 29, 2013) :  The Anticipated Role of Islam (A book written by Osama Kadi and others in Syria
    – 2001 – Amazon.com (July 15, 2007): Adjunct lecturer in Economics at the University of Michigan-Dearborn
    – Osama Kadi (tripod.com – 2002): Personal profile with photo (Osama Kadi mentions that he was a contributing writer for the Montreal-based Italian magazine La Voce.
    – Canada Revenue Agency (2005): Osama Kadi is listed as a director of the London Moslem Mosque
    – Canada Revenue Agency (2006): Osama Kadi is listed as a director of the London Moslem Mosque
    – Canada Revenue Agency (2007): Osama Kadi is listed as a director of the London Moslem Mosque
    – Amazon.com (July 15, 2007): Ad for a CD entitled Be Proud of Islam produced by Osama Kadi (The ad is followed by an extensive bio of the author)
    – Weekend London Islamic School (December 31, 2007): Osama Kadi is identified as the Principal of the Weekend London Islamic School (The school is affiliated with the London Moslem Mosque)
    – Osama Kadi (January 15, 2008): Osama Kadi endorses Muslim thinker Ibn Khaldun (Kadi made the statement on his personal website when he announced the launch of the El Omran cultural Islamic monthly.)


    – Ikhwanweb (June 10, 2009): Lecture by Osama Kadi at the 10th conference of the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy (Kadi's lecture was entitled Improving American Syrian Relations: Toward a Strategic Plan.)
                 – GMBDR (June 14, 2009): Report on CSID’s 10th Annual Conference


    – Muslim Brotherhood leaders and fellow-travellers (May 22, 2009): Open letter asking President Obama to sever links with authoritarian regimes in the Middle East (Osama Kadi is one of the signatories)
    – Osama Kadi (Syrian Economic Task Force – August 29, 2013): Personal profile with photo (Osama Kadi is the general coordinator of the Syrian Economic Task Force)

    Articles / Point de Bascule

    – Point de Bascule (August 16, 2012): Canada gives then cancels a $2 million donation to MB-linked Canadian Relief for Syria

    Références / References

    – Lee Berthiaume (National Post – November 17, 2011): Osama Kadi says that Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird “showed a very positive attitude” toward the Syrian Opposition (London Ontario resident Osama Kadi is the president of the Syrian Canadian Council and a member of the Syrian National Council. The article also mentions many meetings between Minister Baird and Syrian Opposition leader Hassan Hachimi. Hachimi has since been identified as the head of the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood Political Bureau.)

    – Stephen Starr (The Globe and Mail – March 19, 2013): Osama Kadi loses bid to lead Syrian rebel government and criticizes Canada for its lack of support (Osama Kadi: “Canada talks the talk but won’t walk the walk, and Syrians will remember who stood with them in their struggle and those who did not.”)

    – LMM (August 29, 2013): The Weekend London Islamic School is affiliated with the London Moslem Mosque

    – Justin Ling (National Post – August 31, 2013): Canada has given $5.3M to Syrian opposition (Mississauga Ontario resident and member of the Syrian National Council, Hassan Hachimi, says that the money will serve to buy communication equipment. Hachimi has since been identified as the head of the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood Political Bureau.)


    .



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    AVERTISSEMENT

    Point de Bascule n’endosse pas le contenu de ce document. Il est archivé sur ce site uniquement à des fins de référence.

    WARNING

    Point de Bascule does not endorse the content of this document. It is archived on this website strictly for reference purposes.

    The Weekend London Islamic School is affiliated with the London Moslem Mosque

    Original address: http://windmillwebworks.sytes.net/weekendlis/contact.html

    Date (Google cache): August 29, 2013

    lmm wli school


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    AVERTISSEMENT

    Point de Bascule n’endosse pas le contenu de ce document. Il est archivé sur ce site uniquement à des fins de référence.

    WARNING

    Point de Bascule does not endorse the content of this document. It is archived on this website strictly for reference purposes.

    Osama Kadi, Principal of the London Moslem Mosque-affiliated Weekend Islamic School for 2012-2013

    Original address: http://windmillwebworks.sytes.net/weekendlis/forms/Reg._Form%202012-2013.doc

    HTML version of the Word Document (September 9, 2013): http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:8cdsyIMPfqAJ:windmillwebworks.sytes.net/weekendlis/forms/Reg._Form%25202012-2013.doc+http://windmillwebworks.sytes.net/weekendlis/forms/Reg._Form%25202012-2013.doc&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

    Osama Kadi is identified as the Principal of the London Weekend Islamic School (LWIS) at the bottom of the 2012-2013 registration form.

    The LWIS’ address is the same than the London Moslem Mosque’s address (151 Oxford St. West, London, ON N6H 1S3) and the LWIS registration fees are payable to the Mosque.

    lmm wli kadi principal 2012-13


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    Authors: Robert Sibley and Lee Berthiaume
    Reference: The Ottawa Citizen, December 24, 2011, p. A2

    Original title: Canada freezes Syrian regime's assets; 'Assad is cut off,' foreign affairs minister says in announcing new sanctions

    The federal government has ordered Canadian banks to freeze any assets they hold for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime even as it anticipates the tyrant's downfall.

    Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird announced the requirement, dismissing Syrian government claims that al-Qaeda was responsible for two suicide attacks in the country. "Canada will continue to put the squeeze on the Assad regime," Baird said. "We will not sit idly by, not while Assad and his thugs continue to violate the rights of the Syrian people."

    However, Baird could not say how much money and property Canadian banks were holding for the 33 senior Syrian government and military officials and 10 primarily state-run companies affected by the asset freeze. "The financial institutions will be required immediately to review their accounts to find out how much is available, and the RCMP will work with that. Until those reviews have taken place, we can't say to what extent their assets are here."

    In addition to the asset freeze, Baird said Canada would prohibit all imports from Syria, with the exception of food. Nor will Canadian companies be allowed to make any new investments in the country or export equipment, including software for the monitoring of telephone and Internet communications.

    "Assad is cut off. His disgusting brand of violence must stop and come to an end, he must go," the minister said, reiterating the government's call for all Canadians still in Syria to leave by any means necessary. "The Syrian people have endured a violent repression of their calls for basic freedoms and the rights that are essential to human dignity."

    This new round of sanctions is the fourth imposed by the federal government since May in response to the Assad regime's crackdown on opponents.

    Baird's rhetoric appeared to please members of the Syrian National Council (SNC) opposition movement who were in Ottawa on Friday to meet with the minister and Foreign Affairs officials. The organization, which claims to represent all the main factions opposed to Assad, wants Canada to take the lead in encouraging other western governments to recognize the SNC as the legitimate representative of the Syrian people.

    Ahmad Ramadan, a member of the SNC executive committee, described the meeting with Baird and his bureaucrats as "very successful, very constructive."

    In a later interview, he noted that the fact Baird was willing to meeting formally with the SNC is a de facto recognition of the organization's legitimacy. Ramadan said the purpose of the meeting was not only to gain recognition for the SNC, but also to discuss what role Canada might play in aiding the transition to a post-Assad Syria, particularly in regard to ensuring stability in the country.

    SNC delegates asked Baird to withdraw Canada's diplomatic mission from Damascus as a way to further delegitimize the Assad regime and, according to Ramadan, were told "it would happen soon."

    The SNC wants the international community to establish safe havens within Syria where protesters and those opposed to the Assad regime can be safe. "We asked the Canadian government to help convince some countries, some governments in the UN Security Council to bring forward a resolution that will help in the protection of civilians in Syria," SNC representative Obaida Nahhas said.

    Baird shied away, however, from questions about possible Canadian and international military involvement in Syria.

    The UN says more than 5,000 people have died since mass protests against Assad erupted in March. The violence continued on Friday with reports of two suicide bomb attacks on security service bases in Damascus that killed 44 people and injured 166 others. They were the first suicide bombings in the country since the uprising began, and the first against the powerful security services in the heart of the capital.

    Syrian authorities blamed al-Qaeda for the attacks, which came a day after the arrival of an advance team making preparations for Arab League observers to oversee a plan to end the violence.

    The Syrian government claims that more than 2,000 security force personnel have been killed in attacks by armed rebels since March, but the regime's behaviour has received considerable condemnation from both Arab and Western countries. So far, though, the UN Security Council has failed to agree on any formal resolution on Syria.

    Russia and China have already vetoed one resolution proposed by European countries condemning the Assad regime. They accused the West of engaging in regime change in Syria. For their part, the European countries say a proposed Russian resolution on Syria is not tough enough.

    Baird, meanwhile, questioned the credibility of claims that al-Qaeda was behind Friday's bombings, citing previous Assad denials that any violence was taking place within the country. "If it wasn't so serious, it would almost be comical," he said.

    The minister predicted that Assad's regime would fall sooner or later. "Assad will fall, the government will fall, it's only a matter of time."

    Baird voiced support for the SNC, saying it had made progress in establishing its credibility as a possible partner as Canada and its allies push for Assad and his government to step aside. However, he stopped short of fully endorsing it.

    Nonetheless, Ramadan said the minister had reassured them such recognition was on the horizon, but that their lack of a presence on the ground in Syria was a key stumbling block.

    Ramadan also dismissed the Syrian government's claims that al-Qaeda was responsible for the twin suicide bombings. "The regime itself is responsible for these explosions in order to divert the world's attention from the violations of human rights that the regime itself is committing against the civilian population," he said.

    The SNC representatives met later at Carleton University with members of the Syrian Canadian Council to brief them on what has been taking place in the country and to outline the SNC efforts to establish itself as legitimate political alternative to the Assad regime. About 25 people attended the meeting.

    The SNC representatives acknowledged that nine months ago, few could have imagined Assad's regime would be on the brink of collapse. Now, though, as Ramadan put it, "Assad has lost all legitimacy, domestically and internationally. He is going to fall."

    Asked whether a post-Assad Syrian government would end hostilities with Israel and sign a peace accord with the Jewish state, Ramadan equivocated. "The new Syria will be a true factor for stability in the region, particularly with its neighbours.

    "The new Syria will demand the return of the territories under Israel occupation," he added in reference to the Golan Heights.

    Illustration

    Jean Levac, The Ottawa Citizen / Members of the Syrian National Council (SNC) opposition movement - from left, Hassan Hachimi, Obeida Nahas, Anas Abdah and Ahmed Ramadan - had a 'very constructive' meeting Friday with John Baird and Foreign Affairs officials. Caption.

    hachimi sibley berthiaume


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    Informations essentielles / Basic information

    – Website: http://www.islam-canada.com/ 
    – Canada Revenue Agency: File 870635968RR0001

    Articles / Point de Bascule


    Références / References

    – Brian Morton (Vancouver Sun – September 12, 2013): Imam Saadeldin Bahr charged with sexual assault



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    Original address: http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/2013/09/16/john-baird-and-the-muslim-brotherhood/

    Author: Robert Sibley
    Reference: Ottawa Citizen (Blog), September 16, 2013

    Original title: John Baird and the Muslim Brotherhood

    Presentation:

    Point de bascule — the tipping point in anglais — is one of the most responsible, restrained and well researched websites devoted to monitoring the Islamist long-term campaign against the West.  Run by Marc Lebuis out of Montreal, the French language webmagazine devotes itself to probing and exposing Islamist efforts in Canada (particularly in Quebec).

    Salim Mansur, a political scientist at the University of Western Ontario, and a columnist for the Toronto Sun, notes that the mainstream media and the politicians generally avoid the Islamist issue and refers to Point de bascule as one of the few media outlets willing to address the threat — “truly the David in this mighty difficult contest with the Goliath – the Muslim Brotherhood and their petrodollar support,” as he puts it.

    With that kind of recommendation, and the given its solid reputation, when Point de bascule posts an article on its webmagazine site, it is well worth reading. The magazine’s latest missive is a case in point, raising questions as to whether Harper government — and Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird, in particular — has been inadvertently funding Muslim Brotherhood efforts to radicalize young Muslims in Canada and ship them overseas to fight n he (in the) Syrian civil war.

    What Point de bascule seems to specialize in finding connections between seemingly disconnected bits of publicly-available information and stitching them together into a coherent whole. (In the newspaper business we call this — or used to -  investigative journalism.)  In this case, Lebuis and his team of researchers appear to have found some questionable links between Baird and the Muslim Brotherhood that suggest taxpayer money  intended to help Syrian refugees has been diverted to help the Islamist cause in the country’s civil war. There’s no suggestion this was intentional on the part of the minister; rather, the government has at worst been naive and allowed itself to be hoodwinked by Islamist supporters in this country.

    The website is mainly in French, which here’s a translation of the article in question. I have edited it slightly.

    Conclusion:

    Clearly, Point de bascule’s researchers have done a lot of work to connect all these elements of the Islamist presence and activities in Canada. Presumably CSIS and the RCMP are doing their due diligence, too, and, again presumably, keeping the foreign affairs minister informed.

    .

    sibley baird mb part1

    sibley baird mb part2


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    AVERTISSEMENT

    Point de Bascule n’endosse pas le contenu de ce document. Il est archivé sur ce site uniquement à des fins de référence.

    WARNING

    Point de Bascule does not endorse the content of this document. It is archived on this website strictly for reference purposes.

    Wael Haddara, advisor to President Morsi and member of the Egyptian delegation at the United Nations

    Original address: http://www.un.int/protocol/documents/67th%20GA%20FINAL%20LIST%20OF%20DELEGATIONS.pdf

    Source: United Nations / Secretariat, List of delegations to the sixty-seventh session of the General Assembly

    Date: December 28, 2012

    haddara w un document


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    Auteur : Richard Martineau
    Référence : Le Journal de Montréal, 15 septembre 2013, p. 6

    Titre original : Philippe Couillard défendrait-il une liberté à deux vitesses ?

    Comment Philippe Couillard, qui défend le droit de porter le voile au Québec, peut-il apporter son soutien à un homme qui interdit à ses citoyennes de NE PAS le porter ?

    Tout le monde connaît la chaîne de télévision Al Jazeerah. Mais saviez-vous qu’il existe un journal du même nom en Arabie saoudite?

    Journal officiel du pouvoir (pour ne pas dire «outil de propagande»), ce quotidien fondé en 1972 couvre de façon exhaustive les activités de la famille royale.

    Pas question de faire la moindre critique: ici, on flatte le pouvoir dans le sens du poil.

    UN ROI ADORÉ DE SON PEUPLE ?

    Si je vous parle de ce journal, c’est que, dans l’édition du 16 mai 2011, un chroniqueur y a raconté une discussion qu’il a eue avec Philippe Couillard (qui a conseillé pendant plusieurs années le ministre de la Santé saoudien).

    «Je n’oublierai jamais quand l’ancien ministre de la Santé du Canada (sic) m’a rendu visite, peut-on lire.

    «Quand nous nous sommes mis à parler de l’actualité, il m’a dit: “Si je n’étais pas venu en personne au Royaume et si je n’avais pas vu ce que j’ai vu, il aurait été difficile pour moi de comprendre la force du lien qui existe entre le peuple saoudien et son roi.”

    «Je lui ai demandé comment il est arrivé à cette conclusion. Il m’a dit: “J’ai eu plusieurs conversations ces derniers jours avec des employés d’hôtels, des serveurs de restaurant, des chauffeurs de taxi, des fonctionnaires de la compagnie aérienne, des agents de l’État et des hommes d’affaires. Il existe un consensus: les différentes classes font confiance au gouvernement et j’ai pu constater que les sentiments du peuple envers son roi sont sincères et honnêtes.”

    «C’est la parole du professeur Philippe Couillard (et qui veut le contacter peut me demander son numéro)…»

    LIBERTÉ À DEUX VITESSES ?

    Difficile de ne pas sursauter en lisant ce texte. En Arabie saoudite, un pays régi par la loi islamique, les femmes sont traitées comme des citoyens de seconde classe.

    Elles ne peuvent pas conduire une auto, ne peuvent pas sortir du pays sans l’autorisation d’un homme, doivent porter un voile intégral et être accompagnées d’un homme si elles veulent faire du vélo, doivent porter le voile dans la rue, etc.

    De plus, un homme ne peut pas être condamné à mort pour le meurtre de son épouse.

    Comment Philippe Couillard, qui défend le droit de porter le voile au Québec, peut-il apporter son soutien à un homme qui interdit à ses citoyennes de NE PAS le porter?

    Sa défense de la liberté serait-elle à deux vitesses: une pour ici, l’autre pour là-bas?

    Si cette chronique avait été publiée dans un journal obscur, je n’y aurais pas fait attention. Après tout, il ne s’agit pas d’une entrevue en bonne et due forme, mais d’une chronique subjective rapportant une discussion à bâtons rompus qui se serait déroulée off record.

    Mais il ne s’agit pas de n’importe quelle publication: c’est du journal officiel du gouvernement saoudien!

    QUI DIT VRAI ?

    De deux choses l’une: ou le chef du PLQ a bel et bien tenu ces propos étonnants ou le journal officiel du gouvernement saoudien publie n’importe quoi.

    J’ai hâte d’entendre M. Couillard – ou le consul d’Arabie saoudite – là-dessus.

     couillard martineau aradie saoudite


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    AVERTISSEMENT

    Point de Bascule n’endosse pas le contenu de ce document. Il est archivé sur ce site uniquement à des fins de référence.

    WARNING

    Point de Bascule does not endorse the content of this document. It is archived on this website strictly for reference purposes.

    Le journal officiel saoudien Al-Jazirah rapporte l’endossement du roi d’Arabie saoudite par Philippe Couillard

    Adresse originale : http://www.al-jazirah.com/2011/20110516/ln23.htm

    Date : 16 mai 2011

    بعد تحرير الكويت من عدوان صدام حسين وبداية تدهور أوضاع دولة العراق.. وكانت من قبل إحدى أكبر وأغنى الدول العربية.. وحين بدأ أهل العراق يتحدثون بشيء من الحرية.. سئلوا عن نوع الحكم الذي يتمنونه لبلادهم. فكان نظام الحكم السعودي هو خيار الأغلبية. ليس هذا بكلام أقوله دون سند.. وإنما هو حقيقة تناقلتها بعض وسائل الإعلام.. ولم تتناقله بعض آخر، حسداً من عند أنفسهم. وإني أجزم لو استفتيت شعوب العالم العربي كله لرغبت الأكثرية في أنموذج الحكم السعودي..

    واليوم تقدم الأردن بطلب الانضمام إلى مجلس التعاون الخليجي وهناك حديث عن المغرب.

    وهذا لعمري شهادة أخرى واشارة لا يستهان بها إلى أن تجربة الحكم في دول المجلس ناجحة.

    وسواء تم انضمام الدولتين الشقيقتين إلى المجلس أم لم يتم فإني أشارك الكثير من مواطني مجلس التعاون التأكيد على أهمية تركيز المجلس على خططه في تقوية أواصر القربى والتعاون بين مواطنيه واستكمال ما بدأه من برامج والتعجيل في إنجاز السياسات الاقتصادية والاجتماعية وفي مقدمتها فتح الحدود وحرية الحركة والتنقل والاستثمار وتملك العقار وتوحيد المواصفات والمقاييس المختلفة وإلغاء الحواجز الجمركية، وإنجاز الوحدة النقدية، وتوحيد قوانين العمل وغيرها من الأنظمة والقوانين التي تعجل بدمج شعوب المجلس بعضها ببعض من جميع النواحي، وأن تعمل الحكومات على اتخاذ ما يلزم من إجراءات لتقوية المجلس ككيان مشترك سياسياً ودفاعياً وأمنياً.. إن الوقت من ذهب.. وإن طول الانتظار يفضي إلى اليأس.

    مع بداية عام 2011م خرجت بعض شعوب الدول العربية تطالب بحقوق مستلبة أو تنادي بإصلاحات تعجل بإنجازات سئمت الشعوب طول انتظارها.. وبعضها طالب بالقضاء كلية على النظام القائم.

    تعاملت الحكومات الجمهورية مع شعوبها بالحديد والنار. وسالت الدماء.. والدم يغذي الدم..

    وتعاملت الحكومات الملكية مع شعوبها بما هو متأصل فيها من حكمة وخبرة تراكمت جيلا بعد جيل وكانت قمة الحكمة في المملكة العربية السعودية.. حين تحولت جمعة الفتنة إلى جمعة الخير والتلاحم والوفاء..

    شهد العالم أجمع ما حظي به خادم الحرمين الشريفين - أدام الله عزه - من استقبال فريد واستثنائي في صدقه وعفويته وروعته.. حيث كانت قلوب السعوديين كلهم.. كبيرهم وصغيرهم.. رجالا ونساء.. تنبض بحب هذا الرجل القائد.. الأب الرؤوم.. والحارس الأمين.. والقائد الحازم الحكيم.

    حين أظلمت السماء.. واشتعلت النيران من حولنا يمنة ويسره، شمالاً وجنوباً.. واشرأبت أعناق الحقد والخبث والحسد وحشدت اقلامها وحناجرها وكاميراتها متطلعة لأن ترقص رقصات التشفي على جثاميننا.. ساعتها تطلعنا هنا وهناك

    وفي الليلة الظلماء يفتقد البدر

    فأطل علينا بدرنا.. جاءنا أبو متعب.. عاد الينا مسرعاً وهو لم يستكمل علاجه بعد.. وقف مع إخوته وقفة القوي الحكيم.. فوأدت الفتنة في مهدها وذر رمادها في عيون الحاقدين الحاسدين.. وتحولت ظلمتنا نوراً.. وخوفنا أمناً.. ونارنا برداً وسلاماً.. وصدق الله العظيم « وما رميت إذ رميت ولكن الله رمى «.. « ومن يتق الله يجعل له مخرجاً «.

    ولن أنس ما نسيت أنه كان في ضيافتي وزير الصحة الكندي سابقاً، وهو رجل صاحب مكانة علمية وسياسية في بلده.. وذلك بعد جمعة الخير بأربعة أيام.. فلما أن جاء الحديث عن ما هو جاري قال: لو لم أكن في المملكة هذه الأيام ولو لم أشهد بنفسي ما شاهدت لصعب علي فهم الرابطة القوية بين الشعب السعودي وملكه.. قلت وكيف استطعت أن تجزم بهذا الرأي.. قال: لقد لمسته من حديثي ومحاورتي لموظفي الفندق الذي أنزل به.. والمطاعم التي آكل بها ومن سائق التاكسي، ومن موظفي الخطوط السعودية وموظفي الدولة الذين اجتمعت بهم ومن رجال الأعمال الذين أتعامل معهم.. لقد كان هناك اجماع من مختلف الطبقات على الثقة بالحاكم، وأنني أشهد أن مشاعر الشعب تجاه الملك كانت جياشة وصادقة كل الصدق.

    هذا كلام البروفيسور Philippe Couillard

    (ومن رغب في التواصل معه فليتفضل ويطلب مني أرقامه)

    نحن في المملكة العربية السعودية بالذات ودول مجلس التعاون عامة، وكما نرى.. نعيش في واحة خضراء ننعم بالأمن والأمان.. نتعلم من أخطائنا وأخطاء غيرنا ونحاول إصلاحها.. لا ندعي العصمة والكمال سواء حكاماً أو محكومين، بل نعلم ونقر بأننا بشر نخطئ ونصيب. ولكن النوايا سليمة. بلادنا بفضل الله تعالى كلها خيرات.. وأعداد المتعلمين تتضاعف والوعي يرتفع والنقد الصادق الهادف مقبول وصحفنا اليومية شاهد على ذلك.. وما دمنا مخلصين لعقيدتنا متمسكين بشرع الله سبحانه وتعالى نأمر بالمعروف وننهى عن المنكر.. وأعداد مساجدنا في ازدياد.. وأعداد حفظة كتاب الله في ازدياد.. وأعداد الجمعيات الخيرية في ازدياد. يوماً وراء يوم. فإننا نسأل الله تعالى أن يجعلنا ممن {وَلاَ خَوْفٌ عَلَيْهِمْ وَلاَ هُمْ يَحْزَنُونَ}..

    وللحديث بقية.

    couillard al-jazirah saoudien


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    Hussein Hamdani tells the story of his family – Part 2 (From Yemen to Uganda to Canada)

    Original address: http://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/2219133-baba-left-me-a-lifetime-of-lessons/

    Author: Hussein Hamdani
    Source: The Spectator (Hamilton), July 23, 2011, p. A15

    Original title: Baba left me a lifetime of lessons

    Presentation of the author at the end of the article: Freelance columnist Hussein Hamdani lives in Burlington, and works as a lawyer in Hamilton.


    Nothing shocks the system like a cold February Montreal winter night: the first thing my family experienced coming off a plane from Yemen.

    They had never seen snow before and never felt -30 C weather. They must have wondered if Canada was worth it. However, there was no turning back then. There was not enough money to fly everyone back to Yemen; we had to make a life in Canada.

    Eventually, all 18 of us lived in a two-bedroom apartment in Toronto. Although I was very young, I remember the family having to negotiate sleep-time arrangements. Half my uncles took night jobs, while the others looked for day jobs, so that not all of us were home at the same time.

    We all called my grandfather "Baba" which has it roots in Arabic and Swahili for father. Baba was a farmer, and he felt that he had to get back on the land in order to feed his family. He made an appointment with a banker and demanded that the bank provide him a loan to buy a farm. Although Baba did not go to school past Grade 3 (he needed to quit school so he could work and support his brother and himself), he was the brightest and shrewdest businessman I ever met. (As a business lawyer, I have met many businessmen, but no one compares to Baba).

    He taught himself eight languages, including English, and he familiarized himself with the language of business. Baba had no credit rating and no Canadian work experience, but he was determined and desperate. The banker must have seen the ambition in his eyes, and although on paper this loan looked problematic, it was provided. The family bought two poultry farms, one in Waterdown and the other in Fort Erie. To this day, the family is still loyal to the bank that provided the initial loans.

    The farms turned profits within the first year. Eventually, the farms were sold and the proceeds went into other family-run businesses including dry cleaning, importing and exporting textiles, owning commercial and residential property. God has been generous to the family.

    Baba once taught me a story about the Prophet Muhammad. It is narrated that the Prophet said: "Charity is prescribed for each descendant of Adam and Eve every day the sun rises." He was then asked: "From what do we give charity every day?" The Prophet answered: "The doors of goodness are many ... enjoining good, forbidding evil, removing harm from the road, listening to the deaf, leading the blind, guiding one to the object of his need, hurrying with the strength of one's legs to one in sorrow who is asking for help, and supporting the feeble with the strength of one's arms -- all of these are charity prescribed for you." He also said: "Your smile for your brother is charity."

    Baba's point to me was that no matter how much money you may have or not have, real wealth is measured in your generosity and in good deeds. A generosity of spirit is more valuable, in the long run, than excess money in your pocket. He was a man of his word, donating hundreds of thousands of dollars to Canadian charities and community groups. He established interest-free loans for newcomers who wanted to start business ventures in Niagara and Hamilton. He co-guaranteed bank loans so that people had money to start a business. He concentrated his donations in Canada because he was a proud Canadian. He knew first hand that Canada provided a home and shelter to his family, and he was determined to give back to his country.

    When he died, over 1,000 people attended the prayer at the St. Catharines Mosque, a place of worship that he built and paid for, but then donated to the community. The Niagara police provided an escort to the Muslim burial site.

    Many politicians and civic leaders paid their respects: they knew a great Canadian had passed away. The Ontario government awarded him the highest civic senior honour. My grandmother proudly accepted the award on his behalf.

    Although it has been a year since Baba's soul left this world to return to its creator, Baba's life continues to teach us many lessons.

    Some include: if we invest in refugees and immigrants, the results will be rewarding; the more you give, the more you gain -- embrace a generous spirit and you will be wealthier; grandparents are treasures, if you can, spend time with them and learn from them; and we live in the greatest country on the face of the planet -- we should thank God for this opportunity.

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    Hussein Hamdani disrupts a celebration of Israel dressed in an artificially blood-stained shirt

    Original address: http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/January/20/News2.htm

    Web Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/19980614114737/http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/January/20/News2.htm

    Author: Mark Brown
    Source: The Gazette, January 20, 1998

    The Gazette is the daily student newspaper at the University of Western Ontario.

    Original title: Celebration of Isreal (sic) disrupted

    POINT OF INTEREST. Two university police officers and a veiled protestor look on as Hussein Hamdani speaks with USC marketing and services manager Bob Klanac yesterday in the UCC.

    For the second consecutive year, a Jewish celebration was disrupted by a single student protestor in the University Community Centre.

    The celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Independence of Israel was hosted by the Jewish Students' Union yesterday.

    The demonstrator, dressed in an artificially blood-stained shirt with his face and head covered with a scarf, was handing out pamphlets modeled after the JSU's posters used to advertise yesterday's celebration. The flyers acuse Israel of tyranny, oppression and bloodshed.

    "The celebration was not intended to be a political statement, although there are certain people who do not accept Israel because they want a completely Arab area," said Michael Bloom, public relations officer for the JSU. He added the event is held annually to celebrate the birthday of Israel.

    The University Police Department and Entertainment Productions manager Pete Stanbridge, who is responsible for booking the space in the UCC, were contacted shortly after the protestor appeared and asked the student to leave, Stanbridge said. "The concern was that it would disrupt the event or create a situation where tempers might flare."

    Although the protestor refused to comment, his accompanying friend Hussein Hamdani, a first-year law student, spoke to members of the UPD and University Students' Council questioning their grounds for asking the protestor to leave. "I am not protesting anything – I heard that they had restricted someone from walking around," Hamdani said. "This person was doing nothing illegal – a paying member of the USC has the right to walk around the student centre."

    The university does have a general rule on protests, explained USC general manager Jim Walden. Peaceful demonstration is permitted as long as it does not infringe on the rights or privileges of others, but the university can ask a protestor to leave or charge them with trespassing if they defy this policy, he explained.

    Stanbridge added the protestor was allowed to carry the material and could hand it to anyone who approached him. "We agreed to allow the protestor to continue with his political statement as long as he did not act in a disruptive and disorderly manner," said UPD Inspt. Bob Earle.

    Arye Berk, director of the JSU, said he thought the protest was in bad taste, especially in the presence of the children from a Hebrew school who participated in the event.

    "Last year there was a person walking around in chains and the kids were traumatised," explained Michi Ishai, a teacher at the Jewish Community Hebrew day school. "This year we warned the kids about what they might see."

    Berk said the JSU plans to launch a complaint with the USC race relations commissioner. "None of us have the right to distribute hate literature."

    The protest was held during a sponsored USC event in a potentially confrontational nature – we could see how the organizers found it offensive, said USC President Ryan Parks.

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    MSA-UWO invites Jamal Badawi to speak on campus

    Original address: http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/March/12/News7.htm
    Web Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/19980614110648/http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/March/12/News7.htm

    Author: Sara Marett

    Source: The Gazette, March 12, 1998

    The Gazette is the daily student newspaper at the University of Western Ontario.

    Original title: Getting to the root of the law

    The Muslim Legal Society and the Muslim Students' Association is welcoming Jamal Badawi to speak at Western tomorrow.

    Badawi is a professor of law at St. Mary's University in Nova Scotia and will deliver a speech entitled, "The roots of Islamic law: the life of Mohammad," said Hussein Hamdani, a member of the society.

    The free lecture will take place at 6:30 p.m. in Rm. 38 of the Josephine Spencer Niblett Law Building.

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    MSA-UWO President Hussein Hamdani endorses Pakistan’s nuclear tests as “consistent with the Quran message to prepare for war with strength to deter the enemy"

    Original address: http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/June/5/News7.htm

    Web Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/19980614105137/http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1998/June/5/News7.htm

    Author: Michelle Demeyere
    Source: The Gazette, June 5, 1998

    The Gazette is the daily student newspaper at the University of Western Ontario.

    Excerpt:

    Now that the smoke has settled from India's five nuclear weapons tests in mid-May and Pakistan's nuclear response of six tests last week, the reality of a nuclear arms race in South Asia or even a nuclear war, appears to be more daunting.

    […]Hussein Hamdani, president of the Muslim Students' Association at Western, said there is no irrationality in the actions of Pakistan. "Pakistan was completely justified in testing their nuclear bombs. What they did was consistent with the Quran message to prepare for war with strength to deter the enemy."

    Original title: Cold war part two?

    Now that the smoke has settled from India's five nuclear weapons tests in mid-May and Pakistan's nuclear response of six tests last week, the reality of a nuclear arms race in South Asia or even a nuclear war, appears to be more daunting.

    Salim Mansur, an international relations professor at Western explained the stand-off between Pakistan and India is dangerous because it does not garner the same kind of respect the "mutually assured destruction" or MAD policy offered the United States and the Soviet Union in their 45-year long cold war.

    He added the two countries have outstanding issues, unlike the early cold war relationship. The ownership of Kashmir, a mountainous area known for its beauty and cradled between Pakistan, India and China, has been the cause of two of the three wars since Pakistan separated from India as a Muslim state in 1947.

    "They are not the same kind of ideological differences as between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. It's more direct between these neighbours. Pakistan is obsessed with India and has a history of playing catch-up with India," Mansur said.

    Hussein Hamdani, president of the Muslim Students' Association at Western, said there is no irrationality in the actions of Pakistan. "Pakistan was completely justified in testing their nuclear bombs. What they did was consistent with the Quran message to prepare for war with strength to deter the enemy."

    Pras Chatterjee, president of the Indo-Canadian Student's Association, echoed the sentiment of many Indians in Canada and in India. "Why shouldn't a country that has one-sixth of the world's population decide their own nuclear fate?"

    Angela Misri, a graduate student in journalism originally from the Hindu part of Kashmir, was not optimistic the realities of a nuclear arsenal or economic sanctions will be much of a deterrent. "The Indian government is taking advantage of people's ignorance. People cheering in the street think a nuclear bomb is just a bigger gun. In the meantime, everything is so corrupt, they don't know who's going to push the button."

    hamdani h uwog 1998 06 15 pakistan nuclear


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    MSA-UWO President Hussein Hamdani claims that “there is no compulsion in the religion"

    Original address: http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1999/March/11/Focus1.htm

    Web Archive: http://web.archive.org/web/20030530032510/http://www.gazette.uwo.ca/1999/March/11/Focus1.htm

    Author: Lena Hassan
    Source: The Gazette, March 11, 1999

    The Gazette is the daily student newspaper at the University of Western Ontario.

    Excerpt:

    Hamdani stresses the importance of self-education when researching a religion. "Islam is the fastest growing religion in Canada. If a person were to sit down and read from an objective source, he or she would see for themselves why it has caught on in such mass hysteria. It really isn't puzzling.

    "University students are becoming better educated on the topic of Islam. There is no compulsion in the religion. The truth will set itself free."

    Original title: Finding self, finding support

    In a society which seems to be melding into one blurry, fast-paced culture, the role religion plays is a questionable one. Is belief in religion needed within our society or is it simply an idea which faded with the scientific revolution?

    There is no doubt Western is a diverse community with some students holding strong spiritual beliefs and others not believing in religion of any kind. It is easy to see, however, that religion affects the everyday lives of many students.

    The one aspect which brings together individuals from Christianity, Islam and Judaism is their view that religion is about working together as a unit for the love of God.

    Western chaplain Lynn Godfrey considers the reason some may not see any evidence of God is simply because they have given up the search. "What's their definition of God?" Godfrey asks. "Maybe they think the God that they thought was supposed to exist, doesn't. That doesn't mean that God isn't present."

    When values and beliefs are shaken, Godfrey and other chaplains available are there to help students find answers – not to give them. Godfrey says there are many misconceptions concerning chaplains, one being that in order to become a chaplain, you must be Christian. "There is a Muslim chaplain on campus now," she points out. "It helps having chaplains of different faiths working together as a unit. That way if someone comes to me who is of a different faith, I can respect that and refer them to someone else."

    Godfrey reads religious books and talks to people of different religious groups to acquire more information. This knowledge helps her to connect with the many different Jewish and Islamic students, as well as students of other faiths, while allowing her to strengthen her own faith. Godfrey also expresses her delight in learning more, for it helps her appreciate the gifts that other people have to share.

    Hussein Hamdani, a second-year law student and the current president of the Muslim Students Association, speaks of his religious beliefs in a slightly different manner than Godfrey. Although Godfrey speaks about many different Christian groups on campus (over a dozen) and different sects of Christianity, Hamdani points to a togetherness in the community.

    Bidding the month of Ramadan goodbye until next year, Hamdani explains that with millions of Muslims all over the world breaking fast at sunset and praying towards the east at prayer times, there is a sense of fulfillment and closeness among Muslims. Such traditions of Islam help Muslims all over the world come together. "Muslims are more religious than any other group. This is because they have recognized their calling and feel blessed to call themselves Muslim," he says.

    Hamdani also discusses his knowledge dealing with other religions. "I have studied many religions. I've attended church services and read books, but there were still questions lingering in my mind. Even approaching priests proved to be unsuccessful, for they couldn't answer my questions either."

    The more he learned about Islam the more confidence he gained about being a Muslim. Just as Hamdani found solace in his religion, he trusts others will be able to find comfort in it as well and ultimately see it as the answer.

    Hamdani stresses the importance of self-education when researching a religion. "Islam is the fastest growing religion in Canada. If a person were to sit down and read from an objective source, he or she would see for themselves why it has caught on in such mass hysteria. It really isn't puzzling.

    "University students are becoming better educated on the topic of Islam. There is no compulsion in the religion. The truth will set itself free."

    Second-year media, information and technoculture student Natalie Berens says she believes although some people may say there is no God, they will turn towards some form of spiritual guidance when times of misfortune arrive in their lives. "There are going to be times of tragedy in everyone's life. Unfortunately that is something we can't avoid, however the thought of there being no God leaves me feeling empty inside," she says.

    A sense of community also seems to play an important role, although being on the executive of the Jewish Students' Union as the religious and cultural chair, Berens finds some problems with their programming. This year the executives' goal was to get as many students out for their events as possible, however this has caused them to plan so many events that the attendance for some has been quite low – especially the attendance of the first-year students.

    "The advertisements are always cheery and they give an idea – 'let's be one big happy family' – but once I get there the people seem to be judgemental simply because they may recognize me as a student who doesn't come to the events very often," says JSU member and second-year scholars electives student Jordanna Clarfield-Henry.

    The JSU helps out Jewish students by allowing them an office to go to and people to talk to. Above all, it is there to provide protection against discrimination. With misinterpretations and prejudices which seem to plague some around campus, Berens feels all the clubs could work together towards a common goal – peace and acceptance.

    "Wouldn't it be nice to make everybody one, as opposed to putting people into categories? In order for us to grow as a society, we have to learn to see people as people rather than automatically throwing them into a heading or class."

    Although the Asian Christian Fellowship does not participate in cross-religious groups, president Cliff Lee says it is simply because the group's focus is on developing personal relationships with God, not because of disagreement among groups. "It's not that we can't get along," Lee says.

    A small club catering to English-speaking Asians, Lee points to the role of the ACF as building relationships and support among students. "We don't do big events," Lee says.

    Organizing events such as Christ Awareness Week, praise and worship nights and spending time praying and reading the bible, Lee says the group is in tune to each other. "It's about understanding the place God has in our life and moves us to act in a certain way."

    Although this article focuses on three groups on campus, there are a multitude of religously-based clubs and organizations designed to meet the needs of students in terms of community and religion. Included are:

    Asian Christian Fellowship

    Buddhist Philosophy

    Campus Crusade for Christ

    Chinese Christians

    Christian Arab Students

    Cornerstone Student Christians

    Hindu Students' Association

    Jewish Students' Association

    Korean Christian Fellowship

    London Chinese Catholic

    Muslim Students' Association

    Seventh Day Adventists

    Western Inter-Varsity Christian

    Western Sikh Students Association

    Chaplains' Services, Room 255, UCC

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    Hussein Hamdani: "When I was growing up, my friend's father used to call me a terrorist”

    Author: Casey Korstanje
    Source: The Spectator (Hamilton), January 28, 1995, p. C9

    Excerpt:

    Hussein Hamdani, treasurer of the McMaster Muslim Students Association, […]:"When I was growing up, my friend's father used to call me a terrorist. I sincerely believe there wasn't anything malicious to it but he used to say, 'Oh, little terrorist, how are you doing?' When you're in grade seven, 12 or 13 years old, you just kind of laugh because you don't know what else to do."

    Original title: Islam: the Canadian experience Finding acceptance and understanding has been an uphill battle for Muslims keeping the faith in Canada

    Imagine a life where you must constantly keep up with the world news to be able to defuse attacks upon your faith.

    Imagine your deepest held beliefs ridiculed on a washroom wall.

    Imagine a high school teacher or a university textbook tagging a billion people, a fifth of world's population, with a narrow, ill-conceived label.

    Imagine your faith portrayed in the news as synonymous with terror and bloodshed.

    Imagine being a Muslim in Canada.

    The realities of life for Muslims in Canada can be harsh, even frightening.

    There have been scattered reports of women wearing Hijab -- covering their hair and wearing a long-sleeved, loose-fitting gown - - and being taunted and harassed on the streets as has happened in Montreal.

    A Muslim student in Quebec was asked to leave her elementary school because she covered her hair with a traditional scarf.

    Closer to home, Hussein Hamdani, treasurer of the McMaster Muslim Students Association, reported anti-Muslim graffiti on the walls of a washroom at the university this week.

    Anti-Muslim sentiment

    And Arshia Baig, a first-year business student at McMaster University, has twice written The Spectator complaining that international news stories in the media display a decidedly anti- Muslim sentiment.

    Commenting on a Philadelphia Inquirer article carried in The Spectator, Ms Baig wrote, "The author apparently has the religion of Islam confused with some kind of terrorist movement."

    But rather than fading into the shadows, Canadian Muslims are learning how to make adversity work for them.

    More than 1,000 Canadian women belong to the four-year-old Council for Muslim Women based in Edmonton which seeks to educate Muslim women about their rights under the Quran, the Muslim Holy Scriptures (sometimes spelled Koran).

    The council points out that during the 7th century, when the Prophet Muhammad founded Islam, women acted as judges and were free to decide who they would marry.

    And younger Canadian Muslims such as Ms Baig, 19, or Mr. Hamdani, 22, are re-examining their faith, stripping it of cultural influences to be able to address the confusion between Islam and politics.

    "I wrote an essay for one of my political science courses about how Muslims are portrayed in the media," said Mr. Hamdani. He traced negative portrayals to 1978 and the Islamic Revolution in Iran.

    "The Americans were pro-Shah," said Mr. Hamdani. "And now there was an Islamic republic. That's when the negative portrayals began.

    "I remember seeing a commercial when I was kid. There were flashes of Arab and Islamic leaders and the message was, 'These people control our oil."'

    That touches home.

    "When I was growing up, my friend's father used to call me a terrorist. I sincerely believe there wasn't anything malicious to it but he used to say, 'Oh, little terrorist, how are you doing?' When you're in grade seven, 12 or 13 years old, you just kind of laugh because you don't know what else to do."

    Ms Baig added a high school story. "A teacher in grade 12 made a comment in class that really offended me. He said something about two Islamic leaders in power and he called them, 'A bunch of crazies.' I talked with that teacher afterward about his ideas about Islam and fundamentalism.

    "Many times I've found myself defending my religion," she said. "I always have to be on top of the issues because I might have to respond to them."

    One of those issues is wearing Hijab, covering the hair and wearing a long-sleeved, loose-fitting garment in response to Islamic teaching regarding modest dress. The Western impression of Hijab is one of oppression because it has been forced upon women in some societies.

    But that's not what it's about, said Ms Baig.

    Wearing Hijab, or submitting to any other religious code, is only a valid expression of faith when it is done voluntarily. Enforcing a religious code strips away its validity before God. If the heart rebels against an outward act, the act loses any religious significance.

    For example, many religions recommend fasting, but, if one is forced to fast, you are merely being denied food, you are not performing a religious act.

    It is a view supported by the Council on American-Islamic Relations. In a statement released this week, the council said, "The Islamic rules for modest dress apply to men and women equally. If a particular society oppresses women, it does so in spite of Islam, not because of it."

    From a religious perspective, "Hijab is a very personal issue," said Ms Baig.

    "I hope one day to wear Hijab, but I have to come to that stage in my faith. It's not, 'I'm a Muslim so I'm going to wear it.' You have to reach that feeling in your heart," she said.

    "In this society women are objectified... seen as body parts. When you wear Hijab it forces people to see you as a person."

    In religious circles people don't say all Christians are like Jim Jones, or Jim Bakker, Jerry Falwell or John Paul. It just isn't so. So why are all Muslims painted extremists or following the same political agenda. How can anybody paint a billion people with one color, asks Ms Baig.

    "If people in the West read Islam for what it offered... they would see how fair it is," said Mr. Hamdani. "Islam offers liberation.

    "It offers liberation by providing moral constraints for our daily actions. For example, we can't charge usury. I can't make a profit from your misfortune.

    "Islam offers liberation by warning us to guard our modesty. It calls upon men to lower their gaze and not gawk at women, showing disrespect for them.

    "Islam says, do not backbite. If we lived in society where no one would slander another, it would be a lot more peaceful."

    And that message is getting across.

    Islam is one of the fastest-growing religions in Canada. A 1981 census showed about 100,000 people are Muslims. By 1992 that figure had doubled to 200,000. Now, three years later, it has doubled again to 400,000.

    There are more than 500 Muslim families in Hamilton-Wentworth and 200 families in Halton.

    Illustration

    Caption: Barry Gray, The Spectator Arshia Baig with a copy of the Holy Quran. Trying to dispel ignorance around Islam is a part of daily life.

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    Younger Muslims find peace in old ways but community's older people see it as a worrying trend

    Author: Leslie Scrivener
    Source: Toronto Star, February 18, 1996, p. A12

    Original title: Younger Muslims find peace in old ways but community's older people see it as a worrying trend

    Why, asks Rahat Kurd, is there is such emotional investment in a piece of cloth?

    The piece of cloth is called a hijab, the headgear worn by Muslim women and seen increasingly on city streets and in schools.

    It sparks division between generations - some older people wonder why their children adopt what to them is a symbol of repression - and controversy about its meaning.

    Kurd, a writer and Queen's University student, has covered her head since she was 17. Now 26, she wears a hijab as an act of worship.

    It's not political, she says. ''It's very personal and spiritual. I feel I'm doing it in obedience to God, the same way that praying or fasting during Ramadan is done in obedience to God.''

    The principle is modesty. In Islam, it is required of men and women.

    It has become part her identity, Kurd says. ''It tells people I am Muslim. I do it strictly for the sake of my religion.''

    But many older Muslims are concerned about what they say is a growing trend as young Canadian-born Muslims become more devout - some would say conservative - in their religious practices.

    ''I don't want to be separated from Canadian life,'' says Alia Hogben, vice-president of the Canadian Council of Muslim Women.

    ''I am a practising Muslim. I want to be defined as that, but I do not want to be identified by the hijab. To me it symbolizes a lot from my past, which was repressive.''

    The outward signs of this Islamic renewal are the hijab and, for some, floor-length skirts. Young men grow beards and cover their heads.

    They sit apart at gatherings of Muslim university students - men on one side of the room, women on the other. Some feel uncomfortable shaking hands with the opposite sex. They prefer a smile and the greeting salaam.

    They identify themselves first as Muslims.

    They are prayerful, pausing five times a day for the required prayers, and modest and observant of what they call ''proper moral boundaries.''

    That means no dating, no drinking, no premarital sex - a strict code of conduct in what one calls a ''confused age.''

    ''True depth,'' says Abdul- Rehman Malik, 20, president of the University of Toronto's Muslim Students' Association, ''comes from a real relationship with Allah.''

    And the young women laugh at the notion they are diminished or in any way restricted because of their dress or their beliefs. Some say they are feminists, see themselves revitalized, in positions of renewed power and fighting against sexism and male domination in their mosques.

    ''I question everything,'' says Taheera Quick, a vice-president of York University's Muslim Students Association. ''Whenever people say I'm oppressed. I find that hilarious. I've never let anything stop me, but first I follow the rules of Islam.''

    These young people are in the minority, says her father, Imam Abdullah Hakim Quick.

    Of the estimated 250,000 Muslims in the Metro Toronto area, many have left their faith. ''But the number of youth who are committing themselves to Islamic practices is rapidly increasing,'' he says.

    But some Muslims, such as Hogben, have serious reservations about the direction these young Muslims are taking.

    She describes the shared dream of her generation of Muslims who came to Canada as young adults - she from India - to create a unique Canadian Muslim identity.

    ''Any change or revival had to come from a place where Islam hadn't been before,'' she says.

    ''We felt something was going to happen in Canadian society. It would be exciting, people would open their minds, then rejuvenate it somehow. There would be a challenging, critical analysis.

    ''So this pull to conservatism is something we did not expect.''

    She stresses: ''The majority of Muslim women are not wearing hijab. Conservatism is one interpretation of Islam.''

    Many of these young Muslims start wearing the hijab in university. While they may have been among a handful of Muslims in their high schools, they find at university a warm, welcoming group of Muslim students from varied ethnic backgrounds.

    It's a truly accepting, multicultural group, showing the tolerance that Canadians praise but don't always practise, says Hogben.

    ''The other part, and they won't agree, is that it's a political statement of being visibly Muslim in Canada. The sad part to me is that it's a reaction to the subtle and overt discrimination they face in Canada.''

    Full cover-up may also be a statement against the way women's bodies are portrayed in Western society, says Hogben.

    Some of these young people risk the wrath of their parents, immigrants who favor integration and who came from societies where they were not a minority.

    ''These young people feel more free,'' says Muhammad Al-Faruque, who teaches at the University of Toronto, where about 3,000 Muslims are enrolled.

    ''They saw how, in their parents' time, because of colonialism, Muslim culture was secondary to Western culture.''

    One U of T student recalled his father was aghast when he grew a beard and wore a head covering. ``What are you trying to do? I'm putting you through university.''

    ''I can't believe how unsupportive the adult community is,'' says a another student.

    ''They mock you, they ridicule you. They ask who will marry you?''

    U of T student Raneem Azzam says the older generation's resistance is linked to a desire to blend into Canadian society.

    ''Most of us realize we're not the same as Western youth,'' she says. ''We know we're different. That's what made us stronger in our faith.''

    Kurd says her assertiveness in her faith has much to do with being a Canadian Muslim.

    ''You really have to know who you are. You are called upon to explain yourself a lot . . .

    ''I don't really think I would care as much about my religion if I had not been born and raised in Canada.''

    This generation, facing a population whose knowledge of the Muslim world sometimes extends no further than the stereotypical Islamic terrorist, find themselves on the defensive.

    They had a lot of explaining to do during the Persian Gulf war. They were outraged when Muslims were named as suspects, without cause, in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    For some, these events - and the decision last year by the Quebec Human Rights Commission that it was discriminatory for public schools to ban the hijab - led them to learn more about their religion.

    ''Given the incredibly negative portrayal of Islam, you often get people reclaiming that which they are derided for,'' says Amir Hussein, who teaches a course on Islam at McMaster University.

    ''For some of these kids, it's `Here I am, a Muslim. I'm going to give it a positive image of strength.' ''

    While he is surprised at the conservatism among young Muslims, he points out the worldwide trend to conservative religious traditions.

    These young Muslims, like any other Canadians in their 20s, face all the troubles of our times, including a lack of employment and lack of stability.

    ''I don't think they have the same sense of optimism,'' says Hogben.

    ''For some young Muslim women this may be a harkening back to some halcyon days of security, of limits being set for you, clearly set out rules of conduct.

    ''Why wouldn't you go there? It's more comfortable. It's also a case of being proud of who you are and not allowing mainstream society to look down on you.''

    Young women who don the hijab and embrace Islam fully say following the principles of Islam simplifies their lives.

    ''It helps me make better decisions,'' says York University student Nadia Irshad. ''My decisions are more constant.

    ''Automatically I don't have to worry about so many things girls worry about. I don't worry about dating. When I go to class I can focus. I'm not distracted by boys. My life doesn't revolve around getting a boyfriend or pleasing some boy.''

    The goal for many is to practise ''pure Islam,'' one not colored by the cultural practices of different countries, and to lead their parents to this practice.

    ''We have scholars from other countries, but they don't understand the Canadian expression of Islam,'' U of T student Shiraz Sheikh says.

    ''What we need is a group of scholars to understand what it means to be a Muslim in North America.''

    Illustration

    STAR PHOTO (TED ANDKILDE FOR THE STAR): ACT OF WORSHIP: RAHAT KURD, A QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY STUDENT, SAYS COVERING HER HEAD WITH THE HIJAB, A MUSLIM WOMAN'S HEADGEAR, SHOWS OBEDIENCE TO GOD. STAR COLOR PHOTO (GOWER): CONSERVATIVE WAYS: MUSLIM STUDENTS DISCUSS THEIR FAITH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO'S ROBARTS LIBRARY. CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT, SURROUNDING AYMAR RABBANI, ARE SAIMA BHATTI, RANEEM AZZAM, SABA AHMAD, SIRAZ SHEIKH, ABDUL-REHMAN MALIK, HUSSEIN HAMDANI AND FARAZ RABBANI.

    .


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    Announcement of Hussein Hamdani’s appointment to the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security by Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Anne McLellan

    Original address: http://news.gc.ca/web/article-eng.do?crtr.sj1D=&mthd=advSrch&crtr.mnthndVl=&nid=125739&crtr.dpt1D=&crtr.tp1D=&crtr.lc1D=&crtr.yrStrtVl=&crtr.kw=citizenship&crtr.dyStrtVl=&crtr.aud1D=&crtr.mnthStrtVl=&crtr.yrndVl=&crtr.dyndVl=

    Date: February 8, 2005

    List of the 15 appointees:

    Dr. Zaheer Lakhani, Chair of the Roundtable
    Dr. Myrna Lashley, Vice-Chair
    Mr. Leo Adler
    Mr. Riazuddin Ahmed
    Dr. David Bensoussan
    Ms. Carolyn Fowler
    Mr. Ashraf Ghanem
    Dr. Kuldip Gill
    Mr. David Gisser
    Mr. Mohinder Grewal
    Mr. Hussein Hamdani
    Dr. Edna Keeble
    Dr. Vettivelu Nallainayagam
    Ms. Salma Siddiqui
    Mr. Solomon Wong

    Excerpt of the press release concerning Hussein Hamdani:

    Mr. Hussein Hamdani of Ontario holds a Bachelor of Law from the University of Western Ontario and a Master of Arts in International Relations from the University of Toronto. Mr. Hamdani is currently a Barrister and Solicitor with Simpson Wiggle LLP and a law instructor at Niagara College. He also serves as a Public Relations Officer with the Halton Islamic Association and a Senior Advisor to the Muslim Youth of North America Organization. Mr. Hamdani is a Director on the Board of the Hamdani Foundation of St. Catharines and the Settlement and Integration Services Organization of Hamilton. He co-coordinated the Toronto Muslim Summit in 2003 and is a founding member of the Ihya Foundation.

    Original Title: Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Justice announce appointment of 15 members to the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security

    hamdani appointment 2005 ccrs


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    Hussein Hamdani’s report on a meeting between Minister of Public Safety Vic Toews and a Canadian Muslim Brotherhood delegation

    The meeting focused on how the government should interact/outreach with the Muslim communities

    Original address: http://muslimlegal.ca/?p=76

    Date: June 24, 2012

    Participants at two meetings with Minister Toews identified in the article:

    MEETING 1
    Farah Aw-Osman, Ottawa-based Executive Director of Canadian Friends of Somalia;

    MEETING 2
    Yusra Siddique, President of the Canadian Muslim Lawyers Assocation and member of the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security (CCRNS);
    Firdaus Walele, lawyer;
    Sara Khan, lawyer;
    Omar Shabbir Khan, lawyer;
    Maryam Dadabhoy, CAIR-CAN (renamed National Council of Canadian Muslims since);
    Zaid al-Rawni, Islamic Relief;
    Sallah Hamdani, North American Spiritual Revival (NASR);
    Ibrahim Danial, lawyer;
    Hussein Hamdani, lawyer.

    A reference is made to a report written by Mohammad Fadel that discourages an open mention of Islamic principles and concepts in order to explain the motivations of terrorists.

    The author Naseer (Irfan) Syed presents his profile after the article.

    Irfan is a Business and Charities lawyer as well as a Trademark Agent. He is a principal in the firm of Kutty, Syed & Mohamed based in Toronto (Scarborough), Ontario, Canada. His clients range from individual entrepreneurs, family businesses and private companies to not-for-profit organizations, charitable institutions and public companies.

    Original title: First GTA Muslim Community Meetings with Public Safety Minister

    Diverse representatives from the GTA’s Muslim community met for the first time with Public Safety Minister Vic Toews on Friday June 8, 2012 in Hamilton, Ontario to discuss a wide range of issues.   In fact, to our knowledge, this was the first substantive meeting in the GTA between the Muslim community and any Conservative Minister since Prime Minister Harper’s first government was elected in 2006.

    So perhaps to make up for lost time and opportunities, there were in fact two distinct meetings held on that day.

    The first was a meeting with about seven leaders and Imams of the Somali Muslim community, which was reported in a story in the Globe and Mail

    The meeting lasted just over one hour and in some ways it was a continuation of previous dialogue that had taken place with the Ministry of Public Safety without the Minister in various cities, including a conference in Ottawa in December 2010 (see conference report – final). Mr. Farah Aw-Osman, the Ottawa-based Executive Director of Canadian Friends of Somalia was instrumental in setting up the Hamilton meeting.

    While much of what was discussed was confidential, other than what was reported in the Globe story and the general concerns of Somali youth involved in gangs and instances of radicalization, the Somali representatives expressed their very strong concerns about the language used by Government representatives in describing national security threats including the terms “Sunni” Islam.

    The second meeting the same day, saw Minsiter Toews meet with representatives from Muslim lawyers, charities and the Hamilton Mosque.  Mr. Hussein Hamdani, a Hamilton lawyer and member of the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security was instrumental in organizing this meeting and provided MuslimLegal.ca with a report of this meeting:

    “The Minister of Public Safety met with representatives of the Canadian Muslim community in Hamilton as part of a joint North American Spiritual Revival (NASR) and Canadian Muslim Lawyers’ Association (CMLA) sponsored meeting. In attendance at the meeting were Yusra Siddique, President of the Canadian Muslim Lawyers Assocation (and also member of CCRNS), Firdaus Walele (lawyer), Sara Khan (lawyer), Omar Shabbir Khan (lawyer), Maryam Dadabhoy (Cair-Can), Zaid al-Rawni (Islamic Relief), Sallah Hamdani (NASR), Ibrahim Danial (lawyer) and Hussein Hamdani (lawyer).

    “The Muslim representatives expressed their concern with the language the federal government has used in the recent countering violent extremism strategy.  The representatives shared with the Minister various studies in general and an Australian study in particular that looked at the consequences of using exclusionary language.  The representatives asked for four items and the government agreed to work with the representatives on the items, which are:

    1. Use better language (stay away from alienating language and employ more inclusive language)
    2. Support moderate and moderating voices in the Muslim communities through grants and funding [war for the hearts and minds]
    3. Help fund a 3-year leadership and civic engagement project for Muslim youth in between Toronto and Hamilton
    4. Establish a Muslim community working group that meets with the Minister of Public Safety on a biannual basis.

    A subcommittee of the representatives is in contact with the Ministry of Public Safety on next steps.”

    Here is Mr. Hamdani’s Power Point Presentation to Minister Toews.

    The importantace of language which was conveyed to Minister Toews was explored in Australia which produced an excellent Report and Language Guide which are yet to be released to the public.  In the meantime, reference could be made to the Policy Brief written by Law Prof. Mohammad Fadel for the U.S. based Institue for Social Policy and Undertanding and the U.K. British Council called Language Matters: Talking about Islam and Muslims.

    As the two groups of representatives independently conveyed similar concerns over the language used, it remains to be seen whether the Conservative Government will take the concerns of the community into account in the future when making references to threats to national security.

    hamdani meeting vic toews


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    Hussein Hamdani’s PowerPoint presentation to Public Safety Minister Vic Toews on how the government should interact/outreach with the Muslim communities

    Original address: http://muslimlegal.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Conference-v21.ppt

    HTML version of the PowerPoint file: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:vB4idAbgVtkJ:muslimlegal.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Conference-v21.ppt+http://muslimlegal.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Conference-v21.ppt&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

    Author: Hussein Hamdani (Naseer Irfan Syed identified Hussein Hamdani as the author of the Powerpoint presentation to Minister Toews on his blog muslimlegal.ca.)

    Date: June 8, 2012

    hamdani h powerpoint toews 1

    hamdani h powerpoint toews 2

    Slide 1

    Meeting between representatives of the Muslim community and Minister Toews

    June 8, 2012
    Hamilton, Ontario

    Slide 2

    Questions

    How should the government interact/outreach with the Muslim communities?

    How can we make Canada and Canadians safer?

    Slide 3

    Outline

    3 pronged approach to make any society safer:

    Government must bolster efforts and not take any steps that targets one class of people or community;

    Communities must police themselves and have a zero-tolerance for inciting hate; and

    All citizens must make active effort to get to know one another.

    Slide 4

    Government must bolster outreach efforts and target communities

    While there is not clear, consistent path to why some people engage in violent radicalization, there are some common threads:

    Alienation;

    Disenfranchisement;

    Sense that the country is at war with your religious community

    Racial or religious profiling

    Slide 5

    Gov’t actions

    All levels of government, especially federal government must ensure that it does not take any action or inaction that will directly target a specific community.

    Doing so would lead to disenfranchisement and alienation.

    Slide 6

    The Importance of Language

    In July 2010, the Victoria Police and the Australian government released their Talking About Terrorism in Australia Guide

    The aim of the guide is to assist governments and their representatives to make informed and considered decisions when employing terrorism-related language during the course of public pronouncements.

    Slide 7

    Australian guide

    In preparing terrorism related messages, the following principles should be considered:

    Disassociate terrorism from any religious, national or cultural community as a whole;

    Acknowledge the motivation of terrorists;

    Emphasize inclusiveness and commonality of purpose, rather than encourage divisiveness

    Deprive terrorists of legitimacy and discourage the propagation of their worldview

    Avoid using excessive vague, unfamiliar and extraneous language

    Be consistent

    Be mindful of your audience

    Adopt a holistic approach

    Slide 8

    US vs. Canada

    US: In August 2011, US released their “Empowering Local Partners To Prevent Extremism”

    “Protecting American communities form al-Qa’ida’s hateful ideology is not the work of government alone. Communities – especially Muslim American communities whose children, families and neighbours are being targeted for recruitment by al-Qa’ida – are often best positioned to take the lead because they know their communities best. Indeed, Muslim American communities have categorically condemned terrorism, worked with law enforcement to help prevent terrorist attacks, and forged creative programs to protect their sons and daughters from al-Qa’ida’s murderous ideology”

    “Most of all, this strategy reaffirms the fundamental American principles that guide our efforts. As we approach the 10th anniversary of the September 11th attacks, we remember that al-Qa’ida tried to spark a conflict between faiths and divide us as Americans. But they failed. As this strategy makes clear, we will not waver in our defence of our country or our communities. We will defeat al-Qa’ida and its affiliates. We will uphold the civil rights and civil liberties of every American. And we will go forward together, as Americans, knowing that our rich diversity of backgrounds and faiths makes us stronger and is a key to our national security”

    Slide 9

    UK approach

    UK’s Prevent Strategy

    In June 2011, the UK released its “Prevent Strategy” which was meant to articulate the strategy for CVE.

    In the executive summary, the first line reads, “The UK faces a range of terrorists threats. The most serious is from Al Qa’ida, its affiliates and like-minded organizations.”

    “there is evidence to indicate that support for terrorism is associated with rejection of cohesive, integrated, multi-faith society and of parliamentary democracy. Work to deal with radicalization will depend on developing a sense of belonging to this country and support for our core values”.

    Slide 10

    Cdn approach

    The executive summary of our “Building Resilience Against Terrorism: Canada’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy”. states “Violent Islamist extremism is the leading threat to Canada’s national security... violent “homegrown” Sunni Islamists extremists are posing a threat of violence.”

    “Working through partnerships is central to the success of the Strategy. It would include collaboration with Canada’s international partners, security intelligence and federal, provincial and municipal law enforcement agencies, all levels of government and civil society.”

    Slide 11

    Words of the Leaders

    President Obama

    “As extremists try to inspire acts of violence within our borders, we are responding with the strength of our communities, with the respect for the rule of law, and with the conviction, that Muslim Americans are part of our American family”

    President Barack Obama, State of the Union, January 2011

    Slide 12

    Words of the Leaders

    PM Harper

    Near the 10th anniversary of 9/11, PM Harper indentified “Islamicism” as the single largest threat to Cdn security.

    Why would the PM continue to propagate a religious dimension to violent extremism when over a year and a half ago even the American president decreed that the word “Islam” would be banned from describing terrorist enemies as part of official White House policy?

    You will not find the following words in US Army’s counter intelligence manuals “Islamic insurgents”, “Islamic extremists” and “Islamic subversives”.

    Slide 13

    So where do we go from here?

    Muslims need to develop a strong and sustained counter-narratives to violent extremist ideologies as a means to increase community resilience to violent extremist ideologies. These counter narratives should be able to engage violent extremist messages on a number of fronts, including from political, historical, socio-psychological, theological and instrumental dimensions.

    Gov’t may have a role in supporting capacity building programs, or programs that cross ethnic or religious lines.

    Slide 14

    Some Practical Steps the Gov’t can take include:

    1. use better language (stay away from alienating language and employ more inclusive language)
    2. support moderate and moderating voices in the Muslim communities through grants and funding [war for the hearts and minds]
    3. help fund a 3-year leadership and civic engagement project for Muslim youth in between Toronto and Hamilton
    4. establish a Muslim community working group that meets with the Minister of Public Safety on a biannual basis.

    .


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    Point de Bascule does not endorse the content of this document. It is archived on this website strictly for reference purposes.

    The Muslim Community of Quebec acknowledges its affiliation with ISNA

    Original address: http://www.muslimcommunityofquebec.com/#!gallery/c1p9k

    Date (Google cache): September 14, 2013

    NOTE: The original spelling has been respected.

    Section: Established Institutions

    Contact:  514-484-2967​
    Fax: 514-386-4806
    Adress: 7445 Chester Av. Montreal Quebec H4V 1M4 Canada 

    Institutions Established 

    Established a full time mosque

    Established a community centre (MCQ) to provide services to community and new imigrants.

    Established regular Muslim School of Montreal from elementary to high school, recognized by the Government of Quebec. The school is 29-years old. Many of its graduates attend colleges and Universities in different educational disciplines. Check school website.

    Established financial institution, Qurtuba Housing Co-op, twenty years ago, to provide sharia compliant financing for Muslim families to buy a houses. Sharia compliant investment opportunity for investors to earn halal income. Qurtuba is now an independent institution. Check Qurtuba website: www.qurtuba.ca

    ​Full time MCQ office contact.

    ​​Affiliations

    Muslim Council of Montreal:
    www.muslimcouncil.org​ 

    Islamic Society of USA and Canada:
    www.isnacanada.com

    Administration

    ​​The supreme administrative body of MCQ is called “The Council of Trustees”. The council comprises of 25 members that includes a President, secretary, Imam and a treasurer.  The other members are assigned responsibilities such as building maintenance, fund raising, organizing seminars, iftar program, legal problems, financial statement, tax and insurance. All policy decisions are made in this council-contac

    Finance

    MCQ is a registered charitable organization, allowed by the Government to issue tax deductible receipt to donors. MCQ accepts donations, Zakatul Mal, Fitra Zakat in the month of Ramadan, donations for disasters in the world, scholarship for needy students.

    MCQ requests donations for urgent and ongoing renovation because it is an old building. For this purpose a special box marked donations for renovation is put outside.

    mcq isna affiliation


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